Reviews

Read the Review
Mngwa

Read the Review
The Shangs

Read the Review
Alex Cuba

Read the Review
Tri Nguyen

Read the Review
Defend The Rhino

Read the Review
Talltale

Read the Review
Kiwi Jr.

Read the Review
Plaster

Read the Review
Hyness

Read the Review
Black Suit Devil

Read the Review
Yamantaka // Sonic Titan

Read the Review
The Pack A.D.

Read the Review
Chad VanGaalen

Read the Review
Potengowski Anna Friederike

Read the Review
Todd Rundgren

Read the Review
Old 97's

Read the Review
Needles//Pins

Read the Review
Ohama

Share |


Cover Art

Blankket ( )

Pegatively Nositive
Blocks Recording Club ( http://www.blocksblocksblocks.com )

The Blankket is Steve Kado. Steve Kado is the Blankket. Simple enough. Thankfully his music is not so simple. Pegatively Nositive is Kado’s nod to philosopher, social critic, and pop culturist Theodor Adorno. As I think back to my university days where Adorno’s theories were hammered into my head, I barely understood it then and I sure as hell don’t get it now.
Blending futuristic sounds from the past, Pegatively Nositive is the 50th release for Blocks Recording Club, the Toronto based label Kado helped found several years ago. The six tracks of electro dirge opens with “2003”, a pulse of sound reminiscent of late night Brave New Waves. At almost 8 ½ minutes, it seems too short. “No Rainbows” proceeds to clear the dance floor of the uninitiated, leaving the disciples to shake their booty unfettered. “Failure Is Our Game” is the reward for sticking it out. Minimalist and complex all together, the group shout-outs tell it like it is, “there’s never been such a thing as failure without shame”. “Independence Is No Solution” gives babies a good name. Kado explains that “babies only want to dance”. He’s on to something here.
“The End” is actually not the end, just a seven second wake up call for the true end, “Wrong Life”. The Blankket’s final electro torch song is dub-centric with noise manipulation and sweet harmonies. If a song begs to be made into a video, this is it. Clocking at over ten minutes, “Wrong Life” grinds the evening down to a gradual halt as the batteries slowly drain on the old boom box that’s holding this jam together.
Frankly speaking, I have no clue how this all ties in with Adorno. Maybe that’s a question better posed to Steve Kado and The Blankket.

 

By Christopher Veit
Apr 1, 2009

[reviews home] [list reviews]
 
comments powered by Disqus

More Reviews By Christopher Veit

Cover ArtThe Polymorphines
Split The Difference
(Self-Released)
Apr 1, 2009

More Reviews For Blocks Recording Club artists

Cover Art Final Fantasy
Play To Please
(Blocks Recording Club)
Apr 1, 2009
Cover Art Kids On TV
Shape Shifting Mutants / Remixes Volume 1
(Blocks Recording Club)
Dec 6, 2009
Cover Art Mantler
Monody
(Blocks Recording Club)
Aug 30, 2010
Cover Art One Hundred Dollars
Fourteenth Floor b/w Migrant Workers
(Blocks Recording Club)
May 1, 2009
Cover ArtThe Swyves
The Swyves
(Blocks Recording Club)
Aug 30, 2010
Cover ArtBob Wiseman
The Legend
(Blocks Recording Club)
Sep 23, 2008
header bottom